Category Archives: Green Tips

Carbon-Friendly Food Gardening Workshop

On Monday, April 13, 2020, Patty Love will be speaking about Carbon-friendly food gardening at the Brighton Memorial Library starting at 6:30 PM.  Have you been working on reducing your carbon footprint? Have you thought about where your food comes from? Do you know that one of the most carbon-friendly activities is growing your own food? According to Project Drawdown, 12 of the top 20 solutions are categorized as either Land Use or Food. The ethics, principles, and tools, collectively called permaculture and also known as ecological design, provide us with solutions to integrate food production into our landscape while also contributing to climate change mitigation. In this workshop, we’ll learn how to use regenerative design methods to feed ourselves while also creating beautiful edible landscapes including food forest gardens, outdoor living areas, shady pockets, and traditional landscaping forms with an edible twist. We’ll also view and discuss many real life examples of edible creativity! Please join us as Patty Love, founder and owner of Barefoot Ecological Design and Rochester Permaculture Center shares with us:

  • Terminology, ethics and principles for ecological design and permaculture;
  • A design process
  • Tools for applying permaculture/ecological design to your landscape
  • Site considerations for integrating your home into the existing landscape
  • Edible landscaping options with an emphasis on the why and how’s of food forest gardening–examples from home gardening to homesteading

Ask An Expert: Electric Vehicles

Have you been thinking of buying an electric vehicle? All-electric vehicles together with plug-in hybrids all fit into this category. Want to learn more? Click the link to take a look at a pdf file of the latest Electric Vehicle Guide and/or attend our Ask An Expert event at the Brighton Farmers’ Market on Sunday, August 18th, from 9 am to 1 pm. Bob Kanauer will be our expert from 9 am to 11 am, followed by Rob Levine from 11 am to 1 pm.  We hope to see you there!

About Empty Pharmaceutical Bottles

ColorBrightonGreen will stop taking pharmaceutical bottles in mid-June, but we wanted to start providing you with more information about why you cannot put them in your curbside recycle bin and what happens to them when you take them to the Monroe County Ecopark.  Here is the story:

Let’s begin with why pill bottles are not acceptable in curbside recycling in Monroe County:
With current collection methods using compaction trucks, most are crushed and not useable. Most containers are so small they will not make it through the sorting system and end up in the trash. Additionally, most containers contain drug residue. When containers are crushed as above, this residue can become airborne and is dangerous to recycling center employees. Lastly, if these containers were to be accepted curbside, the invariable result is that drugs would be left in them – which is dangerous not only for the reasons outlined above, but with current realities regarding prescription drugs, this is an additional proactive step that can be taken to keep drugs out of the hands of people not authorized to have them.

Here’s the ecopark collection side of the story:
There are no good local reuse options for used prescription bottles because they vary greatly in shape and size and are not clean. Sorting of thousands of containers is not practical for the Monroe County Ecopark staff.

Here’s what happens to used prescription bottles that are dropped off at the Monroe County Ecopark:

It has been determined that incineration is the best method for the disposal of the pharmaceutical containers collected at the ecopark. This incineration occurs along with  pharmaceuticals that are collected from across Monroe County at Covanta Niagara facility in Niagara Falls.

From the Covanta Niagara website:
The Niagara Resource Recovery Facility, a pioneer in the modern Energy-from-Waste industry, began converting municipal solid waste into clean, renewable energy in 1980. Today, the facility uses up to 2,250 tons of waste per day as fuel to generate low-cost steam for neighboring industrial customers and electricity for the Western New York region. By providing reliable, low-cost steam to local manufacturers, Covanta Niagara allows industrial customers to remain globally cost-competitive and help retain jobs in the region. In recognition of safety and operational excellence, the facility has been designated an OSHA Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Star Facility and achieved the International Standardization Organization’s (ISO) 14001 environmental registration. The facility also recovers ferrous (steel) and non-ferrous (aluminum) metals.

Monroe County takes very seriously its responsibility to recycling, and takes great pains to assure that everything that is collected at the ecopark has a viable end-of-life option.
For an in-depth look at the ecopark, please take a few minutes to view this Ecopark video:

Project Drawdown Solution #4: Plant Rich Diet

Plant-rich diets reduce emissions and also tend to be healthier, leading to lower rates of chronic disease. According to a 2016 study, business-as-usual emissions could be reduced by as much as 70 percent through adopting a vegan diet and 63 percent for a vegetarian diet, which includes cheese, milk, and eggs. $1 trillion in annual health-care costs and lost productivity would be saved.
As Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh has said, making the transition to a plant-based diet may be the most effective way an individual can stop climate change.

Sustainable Dairies

Dairy cows and their manure produce greenhouse gas emissions which contribute to climate change. Poor handling of manure and fertilizers can degrade local water resources. And unsustainable dairy farming and feed production can lead to the loss of ecologically important areas, such as prairies, wetlands, and forests.

The World Wildlife Federation (WWF) envisions a global marketplace in which all dairy is produced as sustainably as possible. By working to engage dairy farmers, co-ops, companies and others in promoting the use of sustainable practices, WWF aims to transform the milk production industry. to learn more about their ideas for sustainable dairies, see the WWF website.

 

Project Drawdown Solution #3: Reduced Food Waste

There are numerous and varied ways to address key waste points. In lower-income countries, improving infrastructure for storage, processing, and transportation is essential. In higher-income regions, major interventions are needed at the retail and consumer levels. National food-waste targets and policies can encourage widespread change. Beyond addressing emissions, these efforts can also help to meet future food demand. Read more about what can be done to reduce food waste globally at the Project Drawdown Website.

Impact: After taking into account the adoption of plant-rich diets, if 50 percent of food waste is reduced by 2050, avoided emissions could be equal to 26.2 gigatons of carbon dioxide. Reducing waste also avoids the deforestation for additional farmland, preventing 44.4 gigatons of additional emissions. Project Drawdown used forecasts of regional waste estimated from farm to household. This data shows that up to 35 percent of food in high-income economies is thrown out by consumers; in low-income economies, however, relatively little is wasted at the household level. For more information on this issue, visit the Project Drawdown website.

Alkaline Batteries: New Policy

After struggles in finding places to recycle alkaline batteries throughout 2017, ColorBrightonGreen.org has had to stop collecting them.

Our research has found that from an energy efficiency standpoint recycling of alkaline batteries is not at all efficient even if we could find a free or low cost method to recycle them. Alkaline batteries are not toxic and can be thrown in the garbage.

Rechargeable batteries are more environmentally friendly. A battery charger with 4 AA batteries can be purchased for $20. Additional 4-packs of rechargeable AAA or AA batteries can then be purchased for $10. Some of the rechargeable batteries that can be recharged the most will cost more than that amount.  You can see a link to information about some of the best ones hereRechargeable batteries will pay for themselves in most cases after only 10 charges.

If you have alkaline batteries that you really want to recycle, you can take 1 lb to Batteries Plus Bulbs in Henrietta or pay $20 to have them recycled through Waste Management.

Color Brighton Green will still collect and recycle button and rechargeable batteries.

Recycle Plastic Bags at the Store Please!

Plastic bags that get put in curbside recycle bins do not get recycled. Instead they clog the equipment used to sort and process other recyclable products and then those mangled plastic bags get landfilled.  Local recyclers ask that you not even put other recyclables in a plastic bag for your curbside pickup.  So, please help make recycling efficient by omitting all plastic bags from your curbside recycling containers. You can make a difference by saving and recycling plastic bags with the #2 or #4 on them by taking them back to the store collection sites.  See this link for more information!

ColorBrightonGreen.org Supports 5′ Bike Lanes on East Avenue

ColorBrightonGreen.org supports transportation infrastructure that will provide safe travel for non-carbon emitting vehicles such as bicycles. There is a proposed change to the lane configuration on Route 96 (East Avenue) between E. Highland Drive and Route 31F in the towns of Brighton and Pittsford. The current configuration of Rt. 96  is a 40′ wide roadway comprised of four 10′ wide lanes. The Fall 2017 proposed New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) configuration was three 11’ wide lanes for motorized vehicles (the center lane being a turn lane), and two 3.5′ shoulders/unofficial bike lanes.

While ColorBrightonGreen.org supports the initiative of the NYSDOT to provide wider shoulders on this section of East Avenue, we don’t believe that maximizing speeds and leaving only 3.5′ wide bike lanes will protect the safety of all road users. ColorBrightonGreen and several other community groups (including Mothers Out Front, the Rochester Peoples’ Climate Coalition, and Rochester Cycling Alliance) have responded to a coordinated advocacy effort led by Robin Wilt to call for three 10′ vehicle lanes and two 5′ official bicycle lanes along this section of East Avenue. Such a configuration already exists on East Avenue at Winton Road (less than a half mile from the proposed project area).

ColorBrightonGreen.org sent written comments to the NYSDOT Project Design Engineer Daniel Schwind (Daniel.Schwind@dot.ny.gov), and to the Town of Brighton Board Members, and to other elected officials in December 2017. These letters can be seen here on our website.

Subsequent to local advocacy efforts, the NYSDOT has now proposed two 10′ vehicle lanes, one 11′ vehicle turning lane, and two 4.5′ wide shoulders that would not be official bicycle lanes. As of January 6, 2018, advocacy efforts for three 10′ wide vehicular lanes and two 5′ bicycle lanes continue.

Here are some sources of information for you to consider:  Narrower Lanes Safer Streets Article from Planet Citizen.  Bigger Isn’t Always Better: Narrow Traffic Lanes Make Cities Safer article from World Resources Institute. Narrower Lanes Safer Streets from Research Gate.