Category Archives: Food

Project Drawdown Solution #4: Plant Rich Diet

Plant-rich diets reduce emissions and also tend to be healthier, leading to lower rates of chronic disease. According to a 2016 study, business-as-usual emissions could be reduced by as much as 70 percent through adopting a vegan diet and 63 percent for a vegetarian diet, which includes cheese, milk, and eggs. $1 trillion in annual health-care costs and lost productivity would be saved.
As Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh has said, making the transition to a plant-based diet may be the most effective way an individual can stop climate change.

Sustainable Dairies

Dairy cows and their manure produce greenhouse gas emissions which contribute to climate change. Poor handling of manure and fertilizers can degrade local water resources. And unsustainable dairy farming and feed production can lead to the loss of ecologically important areas, such as prairies, wetlands, and forests.

The World Wildlife Federation (WWF) envisions a global marketplace in which all dairy is produced as sustainably as possible. By working to engage dairy farmers, co-ops, companies and others in promoting the use of sustainable practices, WWF aims to transform the milk production industry. to learn more about their ideas for sustainable dairies, see the WWF website.

 

Project Drawdown Solution #3: Reduced Food Waste

There are numerous and varied ways to address key waste points. In lower-income countries, improving infrastructure for storage, processing, and transportation is essential. In higher-income regions, major interventions are needed at the retail and consumer levels. National food-waste targets and policies can encourage widespread change. Beyond addressing emissions, these efforts can also help to meet future food demand. Read more about what can be done to reduce food waste globally at the Project Drawdown Website.

Impact: After taking into account the adoption of plant-rich diets, if 50 percent of food waste is reduced by 2050, avoided emissions could be equal to 26.2 gigatons of carbon dioxide. Reducing waste also avoids the deforestation for additional farmland, preventing 44.4 gigatons of additional emissions. Project Drawdown used forecasts of regional waste estimated from farm to household. This data shows that up to 35 percent of food in high-income economies is thrown out by consumers; in low-income economies, however, relatively little is wasted at the household level. For more information on this issue, visit the Project Drawdown website.

Benefits of Buying Local Food

Food transportation accounts for 18% of the fossil fuel burned in the US.  By eating local, we support local farmers and reduce oil consumption.  We can ask our grocer which foods are local.  By joining a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture), we can support local farmers by paying a yearly fee for in-season produce for the entire season.  For a complete list of Farmers’ Markets and CSA’s in our area, see nyfarmersmarket.com

ColorBrightonGreen.org is Happy to Consider Impact Earth a Partner!

Many of ColorBrightonGreen.org’s followers are interested in reducing, reusing, and recycling.  Impact Earth is too. They have been working with some of our volunteers to achieve zero waste in the Brighton Central School District.  This is now going to a whole new level and we are pleased to call them a partner in our common interests.  To find out more about Impact Earth, visit their website!IELogoWithTagWhiteCircle

 

How Your Yard and Garden Can Help Fight Climate Change

Easy to apply gardening and yard care methods will restore carbon to the soil – and keep it there – for healthier crops, more resilient gardens and less extreme weather. A series of short films will be shown that provide hope in the face of climate change! Additionally, a discussion will include simple actions everyone can take, starting today, to remove carbon from the atmosphere and put it in the soil where it does more good. Elizabeth Henderson, an organic farmer, published author and leader in efforts that support organic farming and Community Supported Agriculture will introduce the films and lead the discussion. The short films are: The Soil Story; The Pope and Soil Carbon—The Carbon Underground; and Soil Carbon Restoration.

  • When: Wednesday, February 3, 2016, 6:30 PM
  • Where: Friends Learning Center, Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York

PlantPure Nation Comes to Rochester

A plant-based diet has a lower carbon footprint than other diets. On September 27, the film “PlantPure Nation” is premiering in Rochester. We expect this film to bring about a quantum leap in the acceptance of a plant-based diet and its adoption by the mainstream, including health care providers and all sectors of our Rochester community. There will be free vegan refreshments and a lively Q&A after the film.

  • When:  Sunday, September 27, 2015. Two showings: at 1 PM and 4 PM. The 4 PM showing will be signed for the hearing impaired.
  • Where:  Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Avenue, Rochester, NY
  • More info:  You can purchase tickets online. Tickets will also be available at the door. To learn more about the movie, visit the movie website.