All posts by margypeet

Writing as a board member of ColorBrightonGreen.org, a community organization working to raise environmental awareness and action at the local level.

Project Drawdown Solution #4: Plant Rich Diet

Plant-rich diets reduce emissions and also tend to be healthier, leading to lower rates of chronic disease. According to a 2016 study, business-as-usual emissions could be reduced by as much as 70 percent through adopting a vegan diet and 63 percent for a vegetarian diet, which includes cheese, milk, and eggs. $1 trillion in annual health-care costs and lost productivity would be saved.
As Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh has said, making the transition to a plant-based diet may be the most effective way an individual can stop climate change.

Sustainable Dairies

Dairy cows and their manure produce greenhouse gas emissions which contribute to climate change. Poor handling of manure and fertilizers can degrade local water resources. And unsustainable dairy farming and feed production can lead to the loss of ecologically important areas, such as prairies, wetlands, and forests.

The World Wildlife Federation (WWF) envisions a global marketplace in which all dairy is produced as sustainably as possible. By working to engage dairy farmers, co-ops, companies and others in promoting the use of sustainable practices, WWF aims to transform the milk production industry. to learn more about their ideas for sustainable dairies, see the WWF website.

 

Project Drawdown Solution #3: Reduced Food Waste

There are numerous and varied ways to address key waste points. In lower-income countries, improving infrastructure for storage, processing, and transportation is essential. In higher-income regions, major interventions are needed at the retail and consumer levels. National food-waste targets and policies can encourage widespread change. Beyond addressing emissions, these efforts can also help to meet future food demand. Read more about what can be done to reduce food waste globally at the Project Drawdown Website.

Impact: After taking into account the adoption of plant-rich diets, if 50 percent of food waste is reduced by 2050, avoided emissions could be equal to 26.2 gigatons of carbon dioxide. Reducing waste also avoids the deforestation for additional farmland, preventing 44.4 gigatons of additional emissions. Project Drawdown used forecasts of regional waste estimated from farm to household. This data shows that up to 35 percent of food in high-income economies is thrown out by consumers; in low-income economies, however, relatively little is wasted at the household level. For more information on this issue, visit the Project Drawdown website.

ROC EV Ride and Drive Roadshow: Henrietta Public Library

Hosted by Rochester Electric Vehicle Accelerator

WHAT IS THE RIDE AND DRIVE ROADSHOW?

The Ride and Drive Roadshow is your opportunity to join ROC EV in leading our community’s shift to electric vehicles. You’ll learn all about the performance, economic, and environmental benefits of electric vehicles and have your questions answered by local EV drivers. Most important, you’ll have the opportunity to test drive one of the many electric vehicles on the market today.

Throw Some Shade Tree Project

This past fall, Color Brighton Green took on the initiative to plant native trees in Brighton. We started by working with the Town of Brighton to plant 10 trees around the playgrounds at Buckland Park. This spring we hope to plant 15 trees to shade the playgrounds at French Road Elementary School. We are raising funds for this by asking residents to sponsor trees and by selling t-shirts. Every 4 t-shirts sold will be enough to buy a new tree. We hope to plant more trees every year with the funds raised. If you are interested in helping out please complete and follow the instructions on the T-shirt order form-2.

ColorBrightonGreen Supports Carbon Fee and Dividend

ColorBrightonGreen.org Board of Directors supports federal legislation for a Carbon Fee and Dividend Bill and that is being supported by the Citizens Climate Lobby (CCL).

ColorBrightonGreen.org endorses the approach that the Citizens Climate Lobby is taking in building a bipartisan Climate Caucus in Congress to move this bill forward. Both of our organizations believe that if a truly bipartisan caucus supports this bill that it can become reality. You can help by endorsing this bill and communicating that endorsement to our U.S. Representative Louise Slaughter and our two U.S. Senators.

Outlined below are the core components of Carbon Fee and Dividend as outlined by CCL: If you want further information, visit the Citizens Climate Lobby website.

Place a steadily rising fee on fossil fuels: To account for the cost of burning fossil fuels, we propose an initial fee of $15/ton on the CO2equivalent emissions of fossil fuels, escalating $10/ton/year, imposed upstream at the mine, well or port of entry. Accounting for the true cost of fossil fuel emissions not only creates a level-playing field for all sources of energy, but also informs consumers of the true cost comparison of various fuels when making purchase decisions.

Give 100% of the fees minus administrative costs back to households each month: 100% of the net fees from the carbon fee would be held in a Carbon Fees Trust fund and returned directly to households as a monthly dividend. About two-thirds of households will break even or receive more than they would pay in higher prices. This feature will inject billions into the economy, protect family budgets, free households to make independent choices about their energy usage, spur innovation and build aggregate demand for low-carbon products at the consumer level.

Use a border adjustment to stop business relocation. Import fees on products imported from countries without a carbon fee, along with rebates to US industries exporting to those countries, will discourage businesses from relocating where they can emit more CO2 and motivate other countries to adopt similar carbon pricing policies. Building upon existing tax and trade systems will avoid complex new institutional arrangements.  Firms seeking to escape higher energy costs will be discouraged from relocating to non-compliant nations (“leakage”), as their products will be subject to import fees.

Community Choice Aggregation Presentation March 4, 2018

Brighton Neighbors United is hosting an Adult Potluck Supper on Sunday, March 4, 2018. Brighton residents, come and share a meal with your neighbors and learn more about Community Choice Aggregation. RIT Assistant Professor Eric Hittinger will speak to “What is a CCA Anyway?”.  Those who plan on attending are asked to submit the registration form and payment ($5/person) by February 21, 2018.  If you plan to attend, print out the flyer below, complete it, and follow the instructions for submitting it.

BNU supper flyer2018

Alkaline Batteries: New Policy

After struggles in finding places to recycle alkaline batteries throughout 2017, ColorBrightonGreen.org has had to stop collecting them.

Our research has found that from an energy efficiency standpoint recycling of alkaline batteries is not at all efficient even if we could find a free or low cost method to recycle them. Alkaline batteries are not toxic and can be thrown in the garbage.

Rechargeable batteries are more environmentally friendly. A battery charger with 4 AA batteries can be purchased for $20. Additional 4-packs of rechargeable AAA or AA batteries can then be purchased for $10. Some of the rechargeable batteries that can be recharged the most will cost more than that amount.  You can see a link to information about some of the best ones hereRechargeable batteries will pay for themselves in most cases after only 10 charges.

If you have alkaline batteries that you really want to recycle, you can take 1 lb to Batteries Plus Bulbs in Henrietta or pay $20 to have them recycled through Waste Management.

Color Brighton Green will still collect and recycle button and rechargeable batteries.